Diaries Magazine

Wonder Woman

Posted on the 24 January 2013 by Maggiecarlise @MaggieCarlise

The little girl superhero strode confidently across the beige carpet of the living room across the Hall of Justice, the high-tech home base of the Superfriends, heading for the vast hangar that housed her invisible jet.

Wonder Woman was on the job.

She was a small girl, not-quite four, spunky and sparkling a princess of the Amazons, tall, confident and commanding. Her hair, a chin-length bob of medium-brown a wave of ebony black that flowed past her shoulders, was adorned with a white plastic headband a golden crown. She wore purple rainboots with pink and white polka dots high-heeled red boots that came to her knees. Her costume – red cotton tights with a hole in the knee from when she wiped out on her scooter, a dark blue denim jumper, and a pink-flowered t-shirt a spandex-like fabric, red on the top half and adorned with a golden eagle, blue on the bottom half, dotted with white stars – was chosen to make a statement. Her cardboard bracelets that her dad fashioned for her from a toilet paper roll and colored with blue crayon dark blue metallic bracelets, capable of deflecting any manner of attack, doubled as armor. She was, as always, prepared for anything.

The problem she faced this day was a dire one: A number of stuffed animals and dolls people were in need of rescue. Wonder Woman climbed onto the black chair with the scrolled iron back and seated herself at the old drawing board her uncle had salvaged years ago and gave to her dad into her magical invisible jet, a gift from the gods. She adjusted the multi-colored bristle blocks and various Lincoln Logs she’d meticulously arranged atop the drawing board the jet’s controls, checked the magenta ribbon she’d laid carefully beside the drawing board her magic lasso, and nodded at her companions: the plastic Dora the Explorer cup filled with water, the baby doll, and the green stuffed monkey with the pink baby blanket tied around its neck the Wonder Twins, Zan (in his water form) and Jana, and their space monkey, Gleek. Assuring herself that all was well, she slowly brought her jet into the air.

After flying for some time in a room where she had turned out all the lights her mommy allowed her in the ever-darkening night, she arrived at last at her destination. Landing the jet, she left her friends to guard it while she, one by one, gathered up all of the creatures in need of aid and stacked them under the drawing board loaded them carefully into the invisible jet. Many of these rescuees were in need of comfort and she gave this kindly, assuring each one that he or she was safe now, and that they would have a good ride in her jet. As for the inevitable super-villain challengers, she had only to shake her magenta string wave her magic lasso to persuade them to stay far away.

At the end of the day she still had energy left to put her baby doll onto the black iron seat and adjust her hands to look like they were holding a steering wheel give the Wonder Twin Jana her first lesson in flying.  It was, after all, just a typical day in the life of a superhero.

*

It’s said that we’re, each of us, the heroes of our own stories.

I want my little girl to remain a superhero in her own eyes for as long as she possibly can!

 

A fairy-who-takes-care-of-all-the-animals, as she was this past Halloween, works too!

Of course, a “magical fairy-who-takes-care-of-scared-animals-and-is-also-a-ballerina-and-an-artist” (as she was for Halloween) works okay too!

 

*I didn’t follow the DP Challenge to the letter on this post, but the “The Devil is in the Details” Challenge is what gave me the idea to write this little account of my daughter’s current fascination with Wonder Woman up in this manner.

(I’ve never actually gotten myself in gear to try one of these writing challenges before. I’ll have to do another one; this was fun!)

 

The little girl superhero strode confidently across the beige carpet of the living room across the Hall of Justice, the high-tech home base of the Superfriends, heading for the vast hangar that housed her invisible jet.

Wonder Woman was on the job.

She was a small girl, not-quite four, spunky and sparkling a princess of the Amazons, tall, confident and commanding. Her hair, a chin-length bob of medium-brown a wave of ebony black that flowed past her shoulders, was adorned with a white plastic headband a golden crown. She wore purple rainboots with pink and white polka dots high-heeled red boots that came to her knees. Her costume – red cotton tights with a hole in the knee from when she wiped out on her scooter, a dark blue denim jumper, and a pink-flowered t-shirt a spandex-like fabric, red on the top half and adorned with a golden eagle, blue on the bottom half, dotted with white stars – was chosen to make a statement. Her cardboard bracelets that her dad fashioned for her from a toilet paper roll and colored with blue crayon dark blue metallic bracelets, capable of deflecting any manner of attack, doubled as armor. She was, as always, prepared for anything.

The problem she faced this day was a dire one: A number of stuffed animals and dolls people were in need of rescue. Wonder Woman climbed onto the black chair with the scrolled iron back and seated herself at the old drawing board her uncle had salvaged years ago and gave to her dad into her magical invisible jet, a gift from the gods. She adjusted the multi-colored bristle blocks and various Lincoln Logs she’d meticulously arranged atop the drawing board the jet’s controls, checked the magenta ribbon she’d laid carefully beside the drawing board her magic lasso, and nodded at her companions: the plastic Dora the Explorer cup filled with water, the baby doll, and the green stuffed monkey with the pink baby blanket tied around its neck the Wonder Twins, Zan (in his water form) and Jana, and their space monkey, Gleek. Assuring herself that all was well, she slowly brought her jet into the air.

After flying for some time in a room where she had turned out all the lights her mommy allowed her in the ever-darkening night, she arrived at last at her destination. Landing the jet, she left her friends to guard it while she, one by one, gathered up all of the creatures in need of aid and stacked them under the drawing board loaded them carefully into the invisible jet. Many of these rescuees were in need of comfort and she gave this kindly, assuring each one that he or she was safe now, and that they would have a good ride in her jet. As for the inevitable super-villain challengers, she had only to shake her magenta string wave her magic lasso to persuade them to stay far away.

At the end of the day she still had energy left to put her baby doll onto the black iron seat and adjust her hands to look like they were holding a steering wheel give the Wonder Twin Jana her first lesson in flying.  It was, after all, just a typical day in the life of a superhero.

*

It’s said that we’re, each of us, the heroes of our own stories.

I want my little girl to remain a superhero in her own eyes for as long as she possibly can!

 

A fairy-who-takes-care-of-all-the-animals, as she was this past Halloween, works too!

Of course, a “magical fairy-who-takes-care-of-scared-animals-and-is-also-a-ballerina-and-an-artist” (as she was for Halloween) works okay too!

 

*I didn’t follow the DP Challenge to the letter on this post, but the “The Devil is in the Details” Challenge is what gave me the idea to write this little account of my daughter’s current fascination with Wonder Woman up in this manner.

(I’ve never actually gotten myself in gear to try one of these writing challenges before. I’ll have to do another one; this was fun!)

 


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